Say my name b!t(4!

Some of you may remember the title quote from the movie American Pie. While some Orlandons would like to think that "a rose by any other name would still smell as sweet," they are wrong. How we address people, especially in a cultural conglomerate such as Orlando, denotes how we feel towards them and about ourselves.

The "self-fulfilling prophecy" posits that how we feel about people creates the condition for us to be more aware, sensitive, and erroneous to their actions. For example, if Bob has a strong disdain for Sue, Bob is more likely to think everything Sue does is wrong or perceive her actions erroneously. A simple "hello" from Sue may garner negative emotions from Bob. However, if Bob thought kindly of Sue, he would be less likely to perceive a simple "hello" as hostile.

Accordingly, in an era of text lingo and abbreviations, many people tend to shorten things, including names. Perhaps "Richard" is not fond of being called "Rich," "Rick," or "Dick." In some extreme cases noted in Orlando, Richard may be addressed as "Tom" even if Richard's emails and other correspondences contain his proper name.

Those who elect to address Richard improperly by calling him other names are showing that they have a blatant disrespect and disregard for others. They feel they are too important to be polite and show proper etiquette. It is very selfish and rude to continue to address people by names other than their own and against their wishes. Those people have a sense of self-importance and feel they are too busy to show common courtesy.

What about shortening names to only the first letter of the name? That is pretentious in a professional, business realm. It may be appropriate to address your best friend, Barbara, as "B;" however, if someone is hiring or interviewing you, it is highly inappropriate. Would you want to hire someone who shows no courtesy to you or does not respect authority?

Continue reading on Examiner.com:
Say my name b-word - Orlando Etiquette | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/etiquette-in-orlando/say-my-name-b-word#ixzz1DCb9njf6

Etiquette is a concept universally applied

When people hear the word "etiquette," some tend to think of saying "please" and "thank you." However, etiquette is a concept that applies to many situations such as in dating and business and is not limited to "minding p's and q's." Professionalism and etiquette seem to no longer be taught in or out of school. In an age of text messaging, people have grown accustomed to being less than professional in their correspondences.

An Orlando area professional office posting for interns was met with a plethora of responses. "hi im looking for job need to apply cuz jason told me bout it," is not an appropriate introduction and will not garner the attention of an employer. An appropriate introduction would have been, "Dear Sir/Madame: I learned about the internship opportunity from Dr. Smith and am interested in applying." Employers do give leeway to college students but this is the real world, and applicants, ripe or not, are expected to display themselves professionally.

Even in online dating, people tend to be too casual, which leads to less than a stellar first impression. To get someone's attention, some people initiate communications with text lingo. Many people on dating sites are busy professionals seeking motivated, intelligent mates who can formulate complete sentences beyond, "wassup hotie?" Dating and job seeking are similar in that we must make great first impressions to be selected.

Continue reading on Examiner.com: Etiquette is a concept universally applied - Orlando Etiquette | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/etiquette-in-orlando/etiquette-is-a-concept-universally-applied#ixzz1DCabGiJE

Valentine look by Melissa Duran

Melissa Duran, Orlando area makeup artist did not provide an introduction to the look she created. Her model is Desiree Roby, who was photographed by Jolee Stone. Melissa did not provide a release, so we are held harmless should she not have permission to use the photos pursuant to Florida Statute 540.08.

  • Prep / Prime: sheer foundation and light powder.
  • Eyes: a soft wash of eye shadow primer gently buffed out with a buffing brush. A creamy shell color all over the eyelid contoured with a soft brown. A little drama was added to the inner corners by using a charcoal color to intensify the look. White eyeliner was used inside the eye to brighten the model's eyes and make them bigger with black, liquid liner on the top.
  • Cheeks: soft pink tone blush to accent the apples of her checks.
  • Lips: a sheer soft rose petal lipstick overlaid with clear gloss.

Possible 100 points:

  • 1 point for each positive comment up to ten comments (comment submission ends 01/20/2011);
  • 5 points for description / information sentence or paragraph;
  • 5 points for proper color information (e.g. blackened navy blue instead of thunder);
  • 5 points for strict adherence to theme colors;
  • 5 points for resemblance to theme and creativity;
  • 5 points for prepping information (e.g. moisturizer, primer, etc.);
  • 10 points for proof of permission to use images pursuant to the Copyright Act and Florida Statutes 540.08;
  • 10 points for professional etiquette; and
  • 40 points for diversity of age range, facial structure, and skin tone (e.g. use of older models or non-traditional faces or darker skin toned models) - ages 30-40 is up to 10 points, ages 41-100 is up to 10 additional points; 10 points for non-traditional models, everyday people, unique facial structures.
  • 10 extra credit points for "liking" the Orlando Makeup Examiner FaceBook page.
Points awarded:
  • 0 point for each positive comment up to ten comments (comment submission ends 01/20/2011);
  • 0 points for description / information sentence or paragraph;
  • 5 points for proper color information (e.g. blackened navy blue instead of thunder);
  • 3 points for strict adherence to theme colors;
  • 1 points for resemblance to theme and creativity;
  • 0 points for prepping information (e.g. moisturizer, primer, etc.);
  • 0 points for proof of permission to use images pursuant to the Copyright Act and Florida Statutes 540.08;
  • 0 points for professional etiquette; and
  • 0 points for diversity of age range, facial structure, and skin tone (e.g. use of older models or non-traditional faces or darker skin toned models) - ages 30-40 is up to 10 points, ages 41-100 is up to 10 additional points; 10 points for non-traditional models, everyday people, unique facial structures.
  • 10 extra credit points for "liking" the Orlando Makeup Examiner FaceBook page.
Total points: 19
Melissa did not depict thinking outside the box. It is a standard, glamourous beauty work. She has not showcased her work by using an unconventional model.

Glitter glam by Brianna Thompson

This post comes from guest blogger, Brianna Thompson and has not been edited for grammatical content.

Sometimes we all want a little extra sparkle in our lives. Rule number one? Don’t go overboard! You’ll leave a trail of glitter everywhere you go and weeks later, you’ll still be finding sparkly specs all over the place. To avoid a “glitter-palooza,” try mixing it with your eye shadow, bronzer or gloss before applying it. In fact, I’ve seen that Mac offers a pre-mixed “Glitter” with their “Lipglass” for that extra twinkle. Remember to use a primer because it will prevent creases and keep your eye shadow even and in place for hours. Soft Ochre by Mac Makeup is a great one because it goes on creamy but dries quickly. It’s not cakey or thick! It’s perfect to use with glitter products because it helps the glitter stay put on your lid.

If you don't want to mess with glitter, try eyeliner with glitter already in it. Urban Decay has every color imaginable. A little sparkle on your eyelids adds a special touch of enchantment to any look and now there are a ton of different eye shadows that have glitter already mixed in.